The Raj Quartet (1): The Jewel in the Crown, The Day of the Scorpion

The Raj Quartet The Jewel in the Crown The Day of the Scorpion The Raj Quartet Paul Scott s epic study of British India in its final years has no equal Tolstoyan in scope and Proustian in detail but completely individual in effect it records the encounter betw

  • Title: The Raj Quartet (1): The Jewel in the Crown, The Day of the Scorpion
  • Author: Paul Scott
  • ISBN: 9780307263964
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Raj Quartet, Paul Scott s epic study of British India in its final years, has no equal Tolstoyan in scope and Proustian in detail but completely individual in effect, it records the encounter between East and West through the experiences of a dozen people caught up in the upheavals of the Second World War and the growing campaign for Indian independence from Britai The Raj Quartet, Paul Scott s epic study of British India in its final years, has no equal Tolstoyan in scope and Proustian in detail but completely individual in effect, it records the encounter between East and West through the experiences of a dozen people caught up in the upheavals of the Second World War and the growing campaign for Indian independence from Britain The first novel, The Jewel in the Crown, describes the doomed love between an English girl and an Indian boy, Daphne Manners and Hari Kumar This affair touches the lives of other characters in three subsequent volumes, most of them unknown to Hari and Daphne but involved in the larger social and political conflicts which destroy the lovers In The Day of the Scorpion, Ronald Merrick, a sadistic policeman who arrested and prosecuted Hari, insinuates himself into an aristocratic British family as World War II escalates On occasions unsparing in its study of personal dramas and racial differences, the Raj Quartet is at all times profoundly humane, not least in the author s capacity to identify with a huge range of characters It is also illuminated by delicate social comedy and wonderful evocations of the Indian scene, all narrated in luminous prose The other two novels in the Raj Quartet, The Towers of Silence and A Division of the Spoils, are also available from Everyman s Library With a new introduction by Hilary Spurling Book Jacket Status Jacketed

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      Published :2019-09-06T13:26:45+00:00


    About “Paul Scott

    • Paul Scott

      Librarian Note There is than one author in the database with this name See this thread for information Paul Scott was born in London in 1920 He served in the army from 1940 to 1946, mainly in India and Malaya He is the author of thirteen distinguished novels including his famous The Raj Quartet In 1977, Staying On won the Booker Prize Paul Scott died in 1978.



    438 thoughts on “The Raj Quartet (1): The Jewel in the Crown, The Day of the Scorpion

    • There is nothing quite like Paul Scott's the Raj Quartet. I first started reading because of a love of the miniseries, the Jewel in the Crown, but discovered the quartet. There is no book series that quite captures the last days of the British Occupation, and you fall in love with the country, time period, and place. The romance between Guy Perron and Sarah Layton is simmering, and the mystery of the affair in the Bibighar gardens continues throughout the entire series. There is no villan in lit [...]


    • Highly recommended for those interested in the British occupation of India and its aftermath. (Those not explicitly interested should probably turn to others, such as Rushdie or Mistry, or even Seth.) About 200 pages of this book were 5-star plus. The other 300? Kind of a slog if you're not a big fat nerd about the politics. I happen to be that kind of big fat nerd. And this was good, and now I'm only looking forward to finishing all four volumes.Finally, Lili and Daphne are the most affecting c [...]


    • Book a bit long. But good narrative of imperial India. In line w Passage to india but Scott's book more psychologically penetrating. Scott also tries to cover more of the complexities of english occupation and include the creation of pakistan


    • This is an impossibly long book about India during the time of colonial rule, that once I was through the four books I was so sorry to see end :-(


    • Now an army captain,¬†Ronald Merrick, a self-made man of the lower middle class and the former police official in charge of the Daphne Manners case, begins to insinuate himself subtly into the Layton family. We learn what the Laytons do not know, that in a searing session with the incarcerated Hari Kumar, Merrick tortured and molested him.Susan, the younger Layton sister, driven by a sense of her own nothingness, marries Teddie Bingham, a colorless and conventional officer in the prestigious Pan [...]


    • The basis for the superb mini-series The Jewel In The Crown. Scott is a wonderful, delicate writer who served in India & came back to write about it in a fine tetralogy about the Raj. Hari Kumar (or Harry Coomer, as he's called in England) is a tragic figure: caught between his British upbringing & his abrupt landing in India, a land utterly foreign to him. Structurally brilliant, I highly recommend to anyone with an interest in what happened prior to Indian Independence. A true tour de [...]


    • I tried! I really did!Why didn't I like this book? The subject matter is exactly my sort of thing to read. I can't put my finger on why I stopped at page 50. Maybe there wasn't enough action in the plot for my taste. There are lengthy descriptions of locales that also tend to wear me out. ButI will put up with both of these things in a book that is holding my interest. This book didn't hold my interest for an unknown reason. That's where I'm leaving it.


    • This is a book I have picked up and failed to get through at least half a dozen times. And this summer I failed again. I took it with me on a bike trip hoping that as my only reading material, I would finally make it through and discover why so many people seem to like it. After eight nights, I gave up and left it behind in my motel Maybe it's next owner will appreciate it; I never connected with any of the main characters or the plot


    • I came to these through the BBC Jewel in the Crown Series. I loved all of these books and they led to my fascination for novels depicting Indian life, history, customs, etc. I cannot believe very few have ever even heard of Paul Scott! These novels describe the British Raj's occupation of India and the complications of mixing cultures in a superb way. My all time favorite book.


    • This was my second read or The Raj Quartet and Staying On. There are parts of the books that always remain with you. I particularly appreciate the unique way Mr Scott revisited plot lies through the eyes of different characters and through the lens of the passage of time. It was a fascinating era of history and Mr Scott allows you to live it.


    • Characterizations are rich and deep; narrative more than a little tedious. Wished for less emphasis on the often pedantic detail about Indian history/politics and more about the characters, who delivered the history and politics in a much more immediate way. Excellent writing; just not compelling enough in the telling for me to bother finishing. My loss, I'm sure.


    • Impossibly beautiful, tragic, urgent, moving, ecstatic, its frustrating bits of war reportage and historical minutiae included. Nothing, and I mean NOTHING on the British in India comes even close - hell, who cares about the British in India, this is about the human condition as a whole, and very little comes close there too.


    • From this volume, I found later there were two defective sheets (right corner, pp. vii-x) due to publication technique. I'm not sure if I can request a substitution copy like the Penguin hardcover (The Canterberry Tales) from the UK some few months ago. I think I should inform Alfred A. Knopf and see what they can do.


    • I loved all the books of the Raj Quartet! I came to them after watching the BBC mini-series of the same name, and it was so fascinating, I just had to read the books. Within the first paragraph is one of the most memorable lines I've encountered in prose. Look for it.


    • This is a tremendous set of books. It centers around different characters reaction to a single event, the characters being diverse in age, gender, race and attitude and completely believably human. I loved the meticulously detailed description of the physical landscape of India, too.


    • You can read the synopsis to see what it's about. I will just tell you that the Raj Quartet is a marvel, and Paul Scott is the single greatest author you've never heard of.- Chris C.


    • I'm marking this as "done" because I finished the first book. Will have to check it out again when I get back to read Book 2




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